Apple TV – Material Design

Apple TV - material design

I got my AppleTV a couple days ago, but had zero time to do anything with it.  Last night I finally just unboxed it b/c I couldn’t wait anymore, but I still haven’t even plugged it in.

My HD TV set only has three HDMI ports, so I dug around in our TV cabinet last night to disconnect my old Google Android TV box, to make room for the Apple TV.   I can’t even remember what the thing is really called, only that it was made by Logitech.  It started acting glitchy and needed a hard reboot every time I wanted to use it so I just stopped using it long ago.  Like all my other Android devices it seems to have just stopped working sitting around unused, although in this case at least it was supplied with power.  It’s made of plastic and came with a wireless keyboard that had a built-in trackpad that always felt clumsy to use.  It’s about as wide as my Macbook Pro, but light and cheap.

In contrast, I was a bit surprised at how tiny the Apple TV was.  Small form factor, but very solid with a hefty weight.   It’s the best packaged Apple product I’ve seen, yet.  Better than the Macbook Pro or original iPhone packaging.  I heard the watch is really nicely packaged too but I haven’t seen that as yet.  The remote is awesome just to touch and feel, even though I haven’t used it with the TV yet or anything.  It has two kinds of surfaces, one for touch and the bottom half is glass, they both feel amazing.  It’s like no other materials – out of this world.  In a nutshell, it is overtly apparent that the design team at Apple went to great lengths to make this a product like none before it.  I never imagined I would be so impressed with the material design of a device, to bother writing a post about it before even plugging the thing in!

this week’s iOS related resources

tools of the trade

This week’s resources relate to putting together your UI in Interface Builder – Auto Layout, Adaptive Layout, Size Classes, Dynamic Text, and mastering the Interface Builder IDE.  Additionally, we touched on architectural design patterns (MVC, MVVM, etc.).  Finally, most of my students are starting to struggle with networking via the AFNetworking library, and using Objective-C libraries (although none of them know any Objective-C) in their Swift apps using bridge headers. Continue reading “this week’s iOS related resources”

a different approach

Apple UX: Continuity

so microsoft’s strategy has been, ‘one OS for ALL devices’

Apple’s strategy is, ‘one, seamless, continuous experience across ALL devices’.

It might sound like a subtle difference at first glance, but it’s a universe of a difference.  Microsoft demands the user make the same OS work no matter what device you’re on, so we find folks griping about a touch interface on a non-touchscreen device etc.

The Apple user might start writing an email on his/her iPhone, then sit down at a computer and finish it there – the half composed email is magically there.  The UX fits the device, and there is continuity of the task itself.

Hacking the ProForm Tour de France (part 2)

hacking the proform tdf

So tonight I rode Stage One of the 2012 Tour de France on the ProForm TDF bike.  Here’s a link to my ride on iFit.com.

tour de france stage 1
stage 1 ride data, first attempt ever
tour de france stage 1
tour de france stage 1

 

It was a lot easier than I imagined it would be, as it was mostly flat.  I’m sure it will get a lot harder in the next stages as I hit the foothills and then the mountains.  Some quick observations: Continue reading “Hacking the ProForm Tour de France (part 2)”